Foden's Perform at Westminster

Posted by Ian Raisbeck on 24 July 2016

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IMG 2237On Tuesday 14th June Foden’s Band accepted a rare invitation and performed in Westminster Hall at the Houses of Parliament for the National Prayer Breakfast. 

Members of Foden’s Band accepted the invitation from local MP Fiona Bruce to play at the event which hosted 730 dignitaries including Archbishop of Canterbury, General Bishop of the Coptic Orthodox Church, Speaker of House of Commons, Speaker of House of Lords, Church Leaders from across the country and over 100 MPs.

Opportunities to perform at Houses of Parliament are few and far between, with very few events requiring musical performers being held each year (and those that do employing military musicians). Sandbach & Congleton MP Fiona Bruce spoke last February at the Foden’s Patrons Concert of her 6 year ambition to find a way for Foden’s to perform at Westminster, which came to fruition at the Prayer Breakfast.

Speaking about the performance, Fiona said: ‘Foden’s Band played magnificently at the 2016 National Prayer Breakfast in Parliament this week. As Chair of this year’s breakfast I was so proud of them as their local MP. There were over 700 people there in Westminster Hall including 50 Ambassadors from different countries across the world, over 150 Parliamentarians and faith and community leaders from across the United Kingdom. Many Members of Parliament from across the country spoke to me afterwards to say how impressed they were at the standard of Foden’s musicianship and how much their music added to the occasion. They were particularly moved by the majestic piece, ‘O Magnum Mysterium’, so sensitively played by Foden’s during the period of reflection in the programme.’

Following the performance, the band were treated by Fiona to a personal tour of the palace of Westminster, Houses of Commons and Lords. 

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For any conductor and every audience, Foden’s Band is a musical Magic Carpet. It continually takes the listener to places that few other ensembles rarely even approach Howard Snell