Christmas Solo arrangements from Foden's Band Publishing

Posted by Mark Wilkinson on 18 November 2021

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publishing

Looking for some soloistic inspiration for the festive period? Foden's Band Publishing have the solution with three brand new Christmas solos from the pen of the band's principal trombone, John Barber!

Composed by Adolphe Adam in 1847 to the French poem 'Cantique de Noel', O Holy Night has been recorded by a range of artists including Mariah Carey, Cher, Perry Como, Bing Crosby, Whitney Houston, Andy Williams and even Enrico Caruso. Originally arranged for voice and brass as part of the award winning 'Memories of Christmas' album featuring Foden's Band and Matthew Ford, the carol has now been reworked as a cornet solo, in gospel style, with accompanying low brass and solo lines for baritone and flugelhorn, supporting the evocative and distinctive cornet melody.

Based on an 1868 text written by Phillips Brooks and the hymn Forest Green (a tune collected by Ralph Vaughan Williams and first published in the 1906 English Hymnal) O Little Town of Bethlehem is perhaps one of the most widely recognised of all Christmas Carols. This arrangement resets the music as a beautiful Tenor Horn solo within the framework of a graceful and flowing waltz.

Composed in 1818 by Franz Gruber, Silent Night is another immortal seasonal melody which has been recorded by a vast array of singers from every music genre. Another arrangement created for the award winning 'Memories of Christmas' album in 2016, the recording featured the beautiful playing of Foden's principal euphonium Gary Curtin, showcasing a lyrical and heartfelt rendition of this much-loved classic.

All three titles are available to buy in digital format (instant download) from fodensbandpublishing.co.uk or in print from brassband.co.uk, so why not revitalise your festive repertoire today?

For any conductor and every audience, Foden’s Band is a musical Magic Carpet. It continually takes the listener to places that few other ensembles rarely even approach Howard Snell